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It’s worth noting that Wenders has a long history in Japan. His documentary Tokyo-ga from 1985 explored the city through the lens of legendary filmmaker Ozu. He was invited to make a documentary short about the toilets but decided a fictional feature would be a more interesting way to showcase them, which is how Perfect Days came to be. And he’s the first non-Japanese filmmaker to have a film submitted by Japan for best foreign film consideration at the Oscars. Dude’s whole career is about quiet and contemplation on screen. It’s weird to frame discussion of the movie as him being an outsider at risk of imposing insensitive cliches about Japanese culture. He’s a true student of the game, and deeply passionate about Japan and its rich cinematic history. Give him some flowers. There’s no reason to compare his work to “Orientalist drivel” from other Westerners. He’s in a different league.

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I think you're completely right about him being in a different league than other directors who look in on Japan from the outside. A lot of moments in and around the movie could show us his care and dedication to the task, but I felt this especially in his decision to dive into the maw of potentially Orientalist stereotypes about Japan and come up with something very interesting and quite moving!

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